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Cisco v. Juniper: Who Wins the Battle of Residual Value for Your IT Dollars?

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cisco-vs-juniper

Cisco v. Juniper: Who Wins the Battle of Residual Value for Your IT Dollars? 

The Motley Fool recently concluded that Cisco, despite a slump in it’s routing and switching business, is a better stock pick than Juniper. But the report didn’t address the value of each company’s individual products.

Sure, CIOs recognize Cisco as THE leading network equipment manufacturer, a stat backed up by sales figures, but is Cisco really the BEST purchase for an entity looking to maximize its return on investment? The MarkITx team sought out to answer that question, and the results shocked even us. To get to the bottom of this burning question we analyzed one year’s worth of trades on eBay for refurbished Cisco and Juniper firewalls, VPN devices, and switches that could all still be purchased new through retail.

Here’s what we uncovered:

 1. Across the board, people are paying widely different amounts for the same piece of hardware. 

Refurbished Cisco Firewalls and VPNs sold for as high as 80% of retail and as low as 10% of retail and everything in between. Some buyers are paying 5 times too much while certain sellers are listing and selling products well under 25% of fair value.

It all comes back to a lack of transparency in the marketplace for the real value of the products. Enterprises have no understanding of the future depreciation of technology, let alone the current real-time value, because they haven’t had the proper tools and knowledge at their disposal*.

There’s no method to determining the list price on eBay and the marketplace doesn’t know what’s a good buy and what’s not. It may as well be the Wild West. What’s worse, enterprise sellers who sell into the wholesale channel typically receive less than 25% of the median eBay price.

 2. Juniper switches have a slightly lower overall residual value than Cisco, but Juniper switches hold their value over time better than Cisco switches. 

Based on industry perception, you would expect switches from both OEMs to have a very sharp drop off in resale value, but we discovered resale values between 35-50% of retail for products released a year prior, regardless of manufacturer.

Interestingly, the refurbished Cisco switches started out around 50% and followed a linear depreciation dropping to 35%. The refurbished Juniper switches continued to hold their value at around 40% across the 12-month study.

These findings contradict the OEMs’ drumbeat message that their customers need the latest and greatest. In fact, the data show that buyers of used networking equipment are more interested in expanding their existing footprint than they are in frequent upgrade cycles.

*CIOs and IT decision makers can breath a sigh of relief because the days of obscure used IT pricing is over. Our transparent two-sided market allows buyers and sellers to make the most informed purchase decision possible thanks to the MarkITx proprietary algorithms across many different data sources offering predictive pricing on the value of depreciating IT.

Author: Sarah

Michigan native and die-hard Detroit Lions fan, no matter how many times Frank tries to convince me otherwise. Maintaining a delicate balance between social media and logistics in the gritty world of IT. Other duties as assigned include keeping the fridge and cabinets stocked with Whistle Pig, office artwork curation and travel agent services.

One thought on “Cisco v. Juniper: Who Wins the Battle of Residual Value for Your IT Dollars?

  1. Another thing to consider is that these pieces of hardware are mission critical to many companies. At the lower end businesses may not be able to afford it, but at the high end, companies will be shelling out additional dollars on maintenance agreements in order to have top level support, and same or next day service for parts, labor, etc…

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